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McDonald's Return Boosts Blues' Playoff Bid

Wednesday, 03.25.2009 / 11:00 AM / St Louis Blues - Features
By Larry Wigge  - NHL.com
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McDonald\'s Return Boosts Blues\' Playoff Bid
Andy McDonald wanted to improve with the Blues this season, and after recovering from injury, he\'s doing just that.
Heart, Smarts Propel McDonald
What Andy McDonald has brought to the Blues this season is a player whose skates sparkle when he turns on the jets. He's nifty with the puck, with pull-you-out-of-your-seat passes. And he's very, very smart.

"His effort and battle level make it seem like he's playing with a couple more inches and 10 pounds more when he plays against the bigger centers in the NHL," Brian Burke, McDonald's general manager in Anaheim once told me. "It's definitely not a hindrance the way he works out there at a consistently high level every game."

That's also where McDonald's smarts come in. He graduated from Colgate with a degree in international relations. But he also had some international acceptance to work on out on the hockey rink. To that end, he was the ECAC Player of the Year and a first-team All-America in 1999-2000, his senior season. He was also a finalist for the Hobey Baker Award as college hockey's top player. And he put up some mind-numbing statistics at Cincinnati in the American Hockey League before being promoted to the NHL.

"No one ever said it to my face, but I could sense the doubt that a small player like myself could succeed in this game because I'd have to outplay guys much bigger and stronger than myself," the 5-foot-11, 186-pound McDonald said.

But Andy's dad, Steve, a former policeman in Strathroy, Ont., and McDonald's coach growing up, enrolled his son in a power-skating program that gave Andy confidence that he could overcome just about anything.

"Genetics and my body type at 9 or 10 dictated that in order for me to compete with bigger and stronger kids I needed to emphasize skating ... and speed," McDonald remembered. "The speed gave me a power that a lot of the bigger guys didn't have -- and it helped me realize that I could do a lot of things in this game."

"The first time I saw him play, I said to myself, 'Boy is that guy small,' " Andy Murray said. "But before that game was over, I was saying, 'Boy, he's strong and fast and competitive.' "

"Andy has always caught my eyes," Blues GM Larry Pleau said. "What I like about him is that he's a very supportive player, meaning he always seems to be around the puck offensively and defensively -- and that's really important in the way the game is played with flow from end to end in the game today."

"From the time I was a little kid, I always had to work harder to prove myself," McDonald said. "Even today, there's always a challenge with younger players coming into the game -- and you don't want to look bad. This business doesn't care what you've done in the past.

 

The trip home last April was, for the most part, quiet and reflective for St. Louis Blues center Andy McDonald.

Heading to his cottage near his hometown of Strathroy, Ontario, with his wife, Gina, and infant son, Jack, Andy had a lot on his mind -- and a lot of pent-up frustration that he was trying to bottle up. It was just 10 months earlier that McDonald made the same trip after scoring two goals one minute apart in Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Final to help the Anaheim Ducks beat the Ottawa Senators for his team's first Cup title.

The emotions this time were much, much different.

"I kept thinking to myself, 'Five months until next season, I'd better make the most of it,' " McDonald said of an offseason training program that saw him stronger and quicker than he was when the Blues obtained him from Anaheim last December in a trade for Doug Weight. "It wasn't one of my better years. I was traded from a place I thought was home after reaching the ultimate goal in hockey. Then, in less than a year, no playoffs at all.

"I came to St. Louis and it was a struggle for me offensively, and it was a struggle for the team."

But there is no quit in the heart of a champion. There's a resiliency, a relentless drive in the heart of a champion. And with Andy McDonald, there are even more of those intangibles, considering he always had battled long odds and succeeded.

McDonald was once considered a too-small, undrafted product of a school that wasn't a hockey power. He also overcame a pretty fierce wallop to his head by Colorado defenseman Adam Foote in January 2003 that rattled him so severely he wondered if he'd ever play again. It took Andy almost a full calendar year before he felt right again after the concussion.

The hockey gods had yet another test for McDonald earlier this season, when Andy sustained an ankle injury in mid-November. He had gotten off to a 7-goal, 12-assist start in 16 games this season before he found out that his right ankle was both broken and sprained, a double whammy in terms of recovery time. He missed 36 games.

Since Jan. 2, the Blues have a 19-9-6 record, the second-best mark in the NHL. While some look back to the team rallying from a deficit against the Bruins with time running out Jan. 19 in a matinee affair in Boston as a turning point, others look to Chris Mason taking over in goal for Manny Legace after 5-3 loss in Detroit on Feb. 2 and solidifying the team's goaltending. But a Feb. 10 date with Vancouver also has to be thrown into the mix -- the night that McDonald limped back into the lineup.

When Andy scored the game-tying goal in a 3-2 victory at Calgary on March 20 to put the Blues just one point out of the eighth and final playoff spot in the Western Conference, it was McDonald's fifth goal to go along with 12 assists in 20 games since his return to the lineup.

"He was our best player when he went out of the lineup and adding his experience and skills to the lineup since early February has been worth more than a big trade we might have made at the trade deadline," coach Andy Murray said.

"He came back this season more focused and he turned it up a notch again when he came back from the ankle injury," said Brad Boyes, the Blues' leading goal scorer. "I'm his roommate on the road and I can't tell you how important it was to have someone to talk to about what it takes to be a success in this League. It's hard. But he's smart and experienced and always has the right words to explain how I -- or another teammate -- can be better. It's crystal clear that he knows how to win and that he was a part of a long and successful playoff run in Anaheim. He's a champion."

When you sit down next to McDonald, he doesn't look or sound scary. But for most of the last three-plus seasons, he's been Barney Fife turned Incredible Hulk.

"He'll back you off in an instant with his speed and strength on the puck," Toronto Maple Leafs All-Star defenseman Tomas Kaberle said. "I remember watching him in that Stanley Cup Final against Ottawa. He was dominant. He'd fly through the neutral zone and into the opposition end with Teemu Selanne on one side and Chris Kunitz on the other and ... well, seeing that can scare you."

McDonald had 10 goals in 21 games in that playoff run of 2007 after getting 27 goals and 51 assists in 82 games during the regular season. He was a man on a mission that spring -- a caring and motivational leader for the Ducks more than most because he was injured in 2003 when Anaheim went to the Final and lost to New Jersey.

After getting a fair return of 14 goals and 22 assists in 49 games, but playing to a minus-17 after his trade from Anaheim last season, it's safe to say that Andy didn't feel like he was scaring anyone. He uncharacteristically got knocked off the puck too often to his liking.

"I knew I had five months to get stronger and help clear my mind of the kind of season I had," McDonald, 31, said. "That wasn't me -- and my perspective was reinforced in my exit meetings with (Blues president) John Davidson, (GM) Larry Pleau and (coach) Andy Murray. I had five months ... and a lot of work ahead of me."

"The explosiveness in his game was missing," Murray said. "He wasn't on the top of his game from what I remember coaching against him when I was in Los Angeles and he was in Anaheim and I'd have to game-plan against his speed and skill so often being in the same division.

"I wasn't surprised to see him come back to camp this year stronger and with a greater determination. Andy was out to show us he is a champion in every sense of the word.

"All the reports I was getting from our training staff on him during the offseason were that he was off the charts -- and it showed when he stepped on the ice for the first time in camp and you could see he was stronger and back to being dangerously fast. When he got here, I told him we were going to put him on a line with Brad Boyes (43 goals last season) and Lee Stempniak (27 goals in 2006-07). You should have seen the smile on his face.

"Andy is a caring player. To a fault, he's almost too hard on himself. So I tried to put him in a situation like he was in Anaheim when he was at his best. To me, Brad Boyes is that big goal scorer always in the right spot going to the net like Teemu Selanne and Lee Stempniak is like Chris Kunitz is strong on the puck jumping into holes and going to the net."

The situational experiment was an immediate success as McDonald posted 11 points in just four preseason games to lead the NHL and after the first game of the regular season he had four assists on two goals apiece by Boyes and Stempniak. Time and injury ended that experiment as Stempniak was traded to Toronto. But was no coincidence to see McDonald and Boyes combine for that important tying goal in Calgary March 20 -- even if handy Andy has been playing mostly left wing since his return.

"Our entire game is a lot quicker, faster, since Andy came back in the lineup," Murray said.

SCHEDULE

HOME
AWAY
PROMOTIONAL

STANDINGS

WESTERN CONFERENCE
  TEAM GP W L OT GF GA PTS
1 ANA 35 22 8 5 101 96 49
2 CHI 32 22 9 1 100 64 45
3 STL 32 21 9 2 98 78 44
4 NSH 30 20 8 2 81 59 42
5 SJS 33 18 11 4 94 85 40
6 WPG 33 17 10 6 80 76 40
7 VAN 31 18 11 2 89 88 38
8 LAK 33 16 11 6 90 82 38
9 CGY 33 17 14 2 97 90 36
10 MIN 30 16 12 2 86 78 34
11 DAL 30 12 13 5 87 103 29
12 COL 31 10 13 8 78 99 28
13 ARI 31 11 16 4 72 100 26
14 EDM 33 7 20 6 69 110 20

STATS

2014-2015 REGULAR SEASON
SKATERS: GP G A +/- Pts
V. Tarasenko 32 20 17 19 37
K. Shattenkirk 32 5 23 14 28
J. Schwartz 31 11 16 10 27
J. Lehtera 31 8 17 14 25
A. Steen 30 8 13 0 21
A. Pietrangelo 32 3 16 -10 19
D. Backes 31 8 7 -4 15
P. Stastny 24 7 6 -1 13
T. Oshie 24 5 7 2 12
P. Berglund 31 3 7 0 10
 
GOALIES: W L OT Sv% GAA
B. Elliott 8 4 1 .931 1.82
J. Allen 11 3 1 .908 2.47

 
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